World Buiatrics Congress 2016 (WBC 2016) Contact WBC 2016
The World’s Premier Cattle Health Congress
July 3rd - 8th 2016 Dublin, Ireland

Dr. Julia Ridpath

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Lead, Intervention Strategies to Control Viral Diseases of Cattle Research Project at the National Animal Disease Center (NADC)

Biography

Dr. Ridpath heads the Intervention Strategies to Control Viral Diseases of Cattle Research Project at the National Animal Disease Center (NADC) in Ames, IA, where her research focuses on the characterization and control of viruses associated with bovine respiratory disease.  Since earning her PhD from Iowa State University in 1983, she has authored or co-authored over 200 articles (over 160 in peer-reviewed journals), seven book chapters, over 200 abstracts and has submitted over 150 sequences to GenBank. She was co-editor for a book entitled “BVDV: Diagnosis, Management and Control” and has presented keynote addresses at 10 national and 12 international meetings. 

She is a member of the editorial boards for the journals Virus Research and Veterinary Research Communications, has edited the bovine viral diarrhea section for the Manual of Diagnostics Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals published by the O.I.E., and serves on the BVDV Expert Panel for the Discontools Project (European Commission). She is an adjunct member of the faculty of Iowa State University and South Dakota State University, and has served on graduate student committees for the University of Nebraska, Iowa State University, South Dakota State University, Oklahoma State University and the Universidad Nacional Augonoma De Mexico.  Dr. Ridpath is credited with recognizing that viruses that cause bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) belong to two different species (BVDV1 and BVDV2), the isolation and characterization of a previously unrecognized pestivirus in pronghorn antelope (Pronghorn virus) and generating the first full length sequences of a BVDV2 virus, a border disease virus and pronghorn virus. 

Currently she is working with collaborators in Brazil and Argentina to determine the prevalence of exposure of cattle to bovine pestiviruses (including BVDV1, BVDV2 and HoBi-like viruses) in those countries.

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